About the Sullivan County, NY Area

Sullivan County, NY

Sullivan County, NY

Sullivan County’s southern border is located 70 miles to the northwest of New York City.As of the 2010 census, the population was 77,547. The county has a total area of 997 square miles, of which 968 square miles is land and 29 square miles is water surface. The highest point in the county is a 3,118-foot peak known locally as Beech Mountain, near Hodge Pond.

The county is served by eight centralized public school districts including those in the communities of: Eldred, Lake Huntington (Sullivan West), Fallsburg, Grahamsville (Tri-Valley), Liberty, Livingston Manor, Monticello and Roscoe

 The county was named in honor of Major General John Sullivan, who was a hero in the American Revolutionary War. The county seat is Monticello. 

When the colony that is now New York State established its first twelve counties in 1683, the present Sullivan County was part of Ulster County. In 1809, Sullivan County was split from Ulster County.

In the late 19th century, the Industrial Revolution and the advent of factories driven by water power along the streams and rivers led to an increase in population attracted to the jobs. Hamlets enlarged into towns. As industry restructured, many of those jobs left before the middle of the twentieth century.

The county is probably best known as the site of dozens of “Borscht Belt” hotels and resorts, which were established by European Jewish immigrants and operated by their descendants. They had their heyday from the 1920s through the 1970s. Many of show businesses most famous entertainers of the day got their start working in these hotels.

The economy changed again after that, shifting to a more tourist and recreation based theme. The Bethel Woods Center for the Arts in Bethel is located on site of the famed 1969 Woodstock Music Festival and is home to a performing arts center and museum. 

Abundant natural resources of the county include famous trout streams in the west, Beaverkill and Willowemoc creeks, which were the home of American fly-fishing. Sullivan is bounded in the north by New York’s Catskill State Park and on the south by the Upper Delaware Scenic & Recreational River, which is a unit of the national park system, managed by theNational Park Service. The county also provides a setting for numerous summer youth camps.

Town of Highland, NY

Town of Highland, NY

The Town of Highland was named for its hilly elevated terrain, lying north of the Delaware River. The river forms the southwest border of the town and Sullivan County. The town’s population was 2,530 at the 2010 census. The town was formed from the subdivision of the Town of Lumberland in 1853, which also created the westerly neighboring Town of Tusten. According to the US Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 51.7 square miles, of which, 50.0 square miles is land and 1.7 square miles is water surface.

 On that southern border, Barryville is named for William T. Barry, postmaster general under President Andrew Jackson. The community grew up around the Delaware & Hudson Canal, which opened in 1828 and operated until 1898. The canal ran through what is today the center of the hamlet, and the canal company operated a number of stores, an office and a drydock there.

The Upper Delaware River, today a unit of the National Park system, then also served as the conduit for timber cut in the area and rafted to Philadelphia for use in the ship building industry. In 1899, John Willard Johnston, lawyer, historian, and the town of Highland’s first supervisor, wrote a first-hand, biting local history of the canal period, which was published as “Remiscences.”   

Eldred, named for the hamlet’s first settler Charles Eldred, is at the town’s center and is the seat of town government. Two other hamlets include Highland Lake at the northeast and Yulan (Chinese for laurel) to the west.  Early settlers here earned their living by farming and from harvesting the abundant timber.  Late in the 19th Century, the nearby Erie Railroad brought vacation visitors and the creation of the boardinghouse industry, which has since evolved into recreation, camping, and second homes.

The Highland neighborhood of Minisink Ford is the home of the Delaware River Aqueduct for the former Delaware and Hudson Canal, a National Engineering Landmark, which was built in 1848 by Brooklyn Bridge builder John Roebling and is recognized as the world's oldest surviving wire rope cable suspension bridge.

Nearby at Minisink Ford, Sullivan County manages the Minisink Battleground Park, site of the 1779 engagement between raiding British Tories & Mohawk Indians pursued by  militia from Orange County, NY and Sussex County, NJ.  

Town of Bethel, NY

Town of Bethel, NY

The Town of Bethel is located at the center of a circle, 90 miles in radius, from New York City, Albany and Binghamton. Bethel gained world fame in 1969 when some 500,000 people gathered at Max Yasgur's Farm for "Three Days of Peace and Music". The festival was originally scheduled to take place at Woodstock in Ulster County, but even when plans changed the name stuck. The concert site today is the home of Bethel Woods Center for the Arts- performing arts center and museum.

The town has a total area of 90.0 square miles of which, 85.4 square miles are land and 4.6 square miles are water surface. One of the Bethel’s most attractive features is its access to numerous lakes, all within a five-minute drive of each other. They include White Lake (the northern portion of which is known as Kauneonga Lake), Silver Lake, and Lake Superior, which is part of a county managed, state park with the same name.

The first settlers arrived around 1795 near the present communities of Bethel and White Lake. The Town of Bethel was established in 1809, subdivided from the Town of Lumberland. Bethel remains primarily rural and agricultural in character.

By the middle of the 19th century, a tourist industry began to grow. Bethel was home to numerous "Borscht Belt" and numerous sleepaway camps for most of the 20th century. Although some bungalow colonies continue to exist, catering to a largely Orthodox Jewish clientele during the summer, most of the old resorts closed by the 1970s.

The town’s communities include the hamlet of Bethel, located centrally on state Route 17B; Black Lake in the south on SR 55; Briscoe in the north on County Road 144; Bushville in the northeast corner on CR 75; Kauneonga Lake, formerly North White Lake, located at the junction of CR 141 and SR 55; Mongaup Valley, located east of White Lake on SR 17B is the home of county owned, Sullivan County International Airport; Smallwood, founded as sprawling vacation community south of SR 17B and north of SR 55, was renamed from Mountain Lake in honor of founder A.N. Smallwood; Swan Lake, a hamlet located at the intersection of SR 55 and CR 74, north of White Lake, on SR 17B, which is Bethel’s largest community, center of town government, and home of the Dugan Elementary School of the Monticello Central School District. 

Town of Tusten, NY

Town of Tusten, NY

The Town of Tusten in southwest Sullivan County borders theDelaware River and Pennsylvania. Its name is derived from Benjamin Tusten, amilita leader killed during the Revolutionary War while defending the woundedat the 1779 Battle of Minisink.

 The population was 1,515 at the 2010 census.

The town was createdby the state legislature in 1853 by a subdivision of the older town ofLumberland. The first settlement in area was during the mid-18thCentury at Ten Mile River, but it was abandoned during the French and IndianWar. The Ten Mile River Church and Tusten Stone Arch Bridge are listed on theNational Register of Historic Places. Following the 18th Centurywars, Benjamin Homans was is credited as the first settler, setting himself upby Narrowsburg, which today is the seat of town government.

According tothe US Census, the town has a total area of 48.8 square miles, of which, 47.3square miles is land and 1.5 square miles is water surface.

As of the census of 2000, therewere 1,415 people, 583 households, and 367 families residing in the town. Thepopulation density was 29.9 people per square mile. There were 1,008 housingunits at an average density of 21.3 per square mile. The racial makeup of thetown was 89.12% White, 6.93% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.92% Asian,1.13% from other races, and 1.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino ofany race were 3.60% of the population.

The 16.3% population increase in1980 census, was the town’s largest decade of growth since an 18% increase inthe 1870 census. Still the population has remained remarkably stable, as overalldifference over 110 years was only 396 persons, less than 39%.

There were 583 households out ofwhich 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were marriedcouples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present,and 37.0% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up ofindividuals and 17.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age orolder. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was2.89.

In the town the population wasspread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. Themedian age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 103.9 males. Forevery 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.8 males.

The median income for a householdin the town was $38,824, and the median income for a family was $46,250. Maleshad a median income of $35,125 versus $25,938 for females. The per capitaincome for the town was $19,413. About 6.8% of families and 9.2% of thepopulation were below the poverty line, including 8.9% of those under age 18and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.

Communities and locations in Tusten
  • Narrowsburg – A hamlet by the Delaware River. It was formerly called Homans Eddy and Big Eddy.
  • Beaver Brook Corners (or Beaver Brook) – A hamlet in the eastern part of the town.
  • Feagles Lake – A small lake east of Narrowsburg.
  • Hunts Corners – A hamlet east of Narrowsburg on Route 52.
  • Lava – A hamlet east of Narrowsburg on Route 52.
  • Luxton Lake – A lake community east of Narrowsburg on Route 97
  • Neweiden – A hamlet southeast of Narrowsburg on the Ten Mile River, formerly called Swamp Mills.
  • Smith Switch – A location in the northwest corner of the town by the Delaware River and on Route 97.
  • Ten Mile River – A small river and the site of a large summer camp maintained by the Boy Scouts of America, located near Neweiden.
  • Tusten – The hamlet of historic Tusten in the southwest part of the town on Route 97.

Town of Fallsburg, NY

Town of Fallsburg, NY

Fallsburg is atown in Sullivan County. The town is in the eastern part of the county. Thepopulation was 12,870 at the 2010 census.

Fallsburg takes its name from the waterfalls of theNeversink River and was established in 1826, from a subdivision of the towns ofLiberty, Neversink and Mamakating. The town is in the heart of a once popularpredominately Jewish summer resort area known as the Catskills Borscht Belt.

The eastern town line is the border of Ulster County. It is also bordered by the towns of Thompson, Neversink, and Liberty.

Several parks and golf courses are located in the area, including Tarry Brae, Lochmor, Pines, Morningside Park and Mountaindale Park.

The town is known for its many small lakes, ponds, wooded areas, and former dairy farms.

Major bodies of water in the Town of Fallsburg include: LochSheldrake, also known as Sheldrake Pond, Echo Lake, Evans Lake, MorningsideLake, Pleasure Lake, East Pond, and the Neversink River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has atotal area of 79.0 square miles (205 km2), of which, 77.6 square miles of it island and 1.4 square miles of it (1.73%) is water surface.

As of the census of 2000, there were 12,234 people, 3,761households, and 2,478 families residing in the town. The population density was157.6 people per square mile. There were 6,661 housing units at an averagedensity of 85.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 75.19%White, 15.56% African American, 0.43% Native American, 1.17% Asian, 0.03%Pacific Islander, 5.04% from other races, and 2.58% from two or more races.Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.53% of the population.

There were 3,761 households out of which 33.3% had childrenunder the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples livingtogether, 14.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.1% werenon-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% hadsomeone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average householdsize was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.3% underthe age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 32.8% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64,and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. Forevery 100 females there were 133.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 andover, there were 142.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $33,036,and the median income for a family was $39,216. Males had a median income of$31,949 versus $24,583 for females. The per capita income for the town was$16,744. About 15.9% of families and 20.5% of the population were below thepoverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 14.0% of those age 65or over.

Fallsburg celebrates Francis Currey Day each year in honorof Francis S. Currey and other military veterans. Currey received a Medal ofHonor for his bravery in World War II.

The Living Torah Museum, an Orthodox Jewish museum, has abranch of the museum in Fallsburg.

An international retreat center Shree Muktananda Ashram is located in Fallsburg. The center provides a location for students of Siddha Yoga topractice the daily practices of sadhana.[14]

The Fallsburg Central School District serves the town of Fallsburg. The district is the "Home of the Comets". Schools in thedistrict include Benjamin Cosor Elementary School and Fallsburg Junior SeniorHigh School.

Two colleges in the area serve Fallsburg. Sullivan CountyCommunity College is located in Loch Sheldrake and  Yeshiva Gedolah Zichron Moshe is a privaterabbinical college located in South Fallsburg.[19][20]

Stagedoor Manor is a performing arts summer camp located inLoch Sheldrake, New York. Each summer Stagedoor Manor holds threethree-week-long sessions that start in late June and end in August.

The Fallsburg Library serves the town and is located inSouth Fallsburg. It has been in operation since 1991.

Two correctional facilities are located in the area andoperated by the New York State Department of Correctional Services. WoodbourneCorrectional Facility, a medium security men's prison and Sullivan CorrectionalFacility is a maximum security prison for male inmates .

Communities:

Divine Corners – A location north of Loch Sheldrake onCounty Road 105. 

Fallsburgh – The hamlet of Fallsburgh, formerly known as"Neversink Falls" or "Old Falls," or just plain"Fallsburg", is on Route 42.

Glen Wild – A hamlet by the south town line on CountyRoad  58.

Hasbrouck – A small hamlet, north of Loch Sheldrake onHasbrouck Road.

Hurleyville – A hamlet formerly called "Luzon Station”on CR 107.

Loch Sheldrake – A hamlet in the northwest part of the townon Route 52.

Mountaindale – A hamlet in the southeast part of the town onCR 54, formerly called "Sandburg."

South Fallsburg – A hamlet on SR 42 by the western townline.

Woodridge – The Village of Woodridge. Formerly known as"Centreville."

Woodbourne – A hamlet on Route 52 and north of Fallsburghamlet.

Town of Lumberland, NY

Town of Lumberland, NY

Lumberland is a rural community in the southwest part Sullivan County, NY. The seat of town government is located in the hamlet of Glen Spey. The population was 2,468 at the 2010 census.

History

Then in Ulster County, the town was formed in 1798 from the Town of Mamakating, and was subsequently reduced to form the towns of Thompson (1803), Liberty (1807) and Bethel (1809). The town was partitioned again in 1853 into three parts, creating, Highland, Tusten and current Lumberland.

Lumberland in its current form began to blossom when the Delaware and Hudson Canal opened in 1828. The canal helped transport Anthracite coal from the mines of northeastern Pennsylvania to the burgeoning markets of major cities. Settlements that popped up along the canal included Pond Eddy, Knights Eddy, Handsome Eddy, and Mongaup. When the canal was phased out due to the advent of railroads on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware, its bed was converted into the current New York State Route 97 in the 1930s.

The 1904 Pond Eddy interstate bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 and is currently (2016) due for replacement and demolition.

Location

The southwest town line is the Delaware River and the border of Pennsylvania. The east town line is the border of Orange County, New York. The north is bordered by the town of Forestburgh, and the west by the town of Highland.

The area has maintained its rural characteristics, being largely residential, with minimal commerce. There is one gas station in Glen Spey, and there are no traffic lights in Lumberland.

Lumberland is located within the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River. Elevations range from approximately 600 feet near the Delaware River to over 1,300 feet above sea level on the bluffs overlooking the Delaware, and where the Catskill Mountains begin to rise in the northern reaches of the town. The terrain is largely mountainous and wooded, with the majority of residents settling close to or on main roads, such as New York State Route 97 (Upper Delaware Scenic Byway).

Rivers and streams abound in Lumberland. The Delaware River is widely accessible through rafting companies that do day trips and that have campsites dotted along the river. The Mill Brook runs north-south from the Black Forest Colony, through Pond Eddy hollow, to the Delaware at the Mill Brook Inn. Fish Cabin Brook takes a similar course just to the east. The Mongaup River runs from Rio Reservoir southward into the Delaware at the Orange County line.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 49.6 square miles, of which, 47.0 square miles of it is land and 2.6 square miles of it (5.30%) is water surface.

Population

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,939 people, 781 households, and 538 families residing in the town. The population density was 41.2 people per square mile. There were 1,419 housing units at an average density of 30.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 96.75% White, 0.21% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.83% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 0.77% from other races, and 1.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.91% of the population.

There were 781 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.6% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.02.

The population includes 25.6% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 24.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $42,625, and the median income for a family was $45,100. Males had a median income of $38,080 versus $27,222 for females. The per capita income for the town was $19,665. About 8.7% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.0% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Communities and locations in Lumberland

Black Forest – A private community in Glen Spey off of Hollow Road, north of Pond Eddy.

Glen Spey – A hamlet near the center of the town.

Handsome Eddy – A hamlet on the western town line, on north bank of the Delaware River.

Knights Eddy – A hamlet on the Delaware River on the southern town line, east of Pond Eddy.

Mohican Lake – A lake community in the northwestern part of the town.

Mongaup – A hamlet in the southeastern part of the town by the Delaware and Mongaup Rivers.

Pond Eddy – A hamlet on the north bank of the Delaware River. The Pond Eddy Bridge is located here.

Rio Reservoir – A reservoir at the east town line.

Upper Mongaup – A hamlet by the east town line

Town of Fremont, NY

Town of Fremont, NY

Named for the Civil War Gen. John C. Fremont, the Town ofFremont is located in the northwest part of the county. The town’s populationwas 1,381 at the 2010 census.

History

By a vote of the residents, the town was formed from part ofthe Town of Callicoon in 1851. When the town was first settled, around 1780,the absence of roads restrained growth, since the Delaware River provided theonly means of entry. The town was known for its lumber and tannery industriesin the 19th Century.

Geography and climate

The northwest town line is the border of Delaware County, New York, and the southwest town line is the border of Pennsylvania (Wayne County), bounded by the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, which is managed by the National Park Service.

The climate of the town is typical of the interiornortheast. Made up of hills of about 2,000 ft. in elevation and valleys under1,000 ft. The majority of the town is forested with open fields scatteredabout.

The weather in the summer is cool with temperatures rarelyreaching 90 and averaging in the 70's in the day and around 60 at night. In thespring and fall temperatures are very inconsistent with warm days in the 70'sand cold days with snow. The winters can be very cold, with average high'sbelow freezing for most of the winter and nighttime temperatures often droppingto near 0. The average snowfall is upwards of 6 feet per year, with snow coverover the majority of the winter.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has atotal area of 51.2 square miles, of which, 50.3 square miles is land and 0.9square miles is water surface.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,391 people, 563households, and 394 families residing in the town. The population density was27.6 people per square mile. There were 1,182 housing units at an average densityof 23.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 94.75% White, 1.58%African American, 0.43% Native American, 1.01% Asian, 0.79% from other races,and 1.44% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% ofthe population.

Of the 563 households, 31.4% had children under the age of18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 8.7% had afemale householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 27.0%of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alonewho was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and theaverage family size was 3.00.

In the town the population includes 25.6% under the age of18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% whowere 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, therewere 94.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $33,125,and the median income for a family was $40,938. Males had a median income of$29,338 versus $27,125 for females. The per capita income for the town was$18,087. About 13.2% of families and 15.7% of the population were below thepoverty line, including 21.8% of those under age 18 and 16.5% of those age 65or over.

Communities andlocations in Fremont

Acidalia – A hamlet by the northwest town line.

Basket – A hamlet in the western part of the town, east ofLong Eddy.

Buck Brook – A location in the east part of the town.

Fernwood – A hamlet in the western part of the town near thenorth town line.

Fremont Center – A hamlet west of the town center on Routes93,94, and 95.

Hankins – A hamlet believed to be the site of the firstsettlement. Hankins is located near the Delaware River in the western part ofthe town on Route 97. Located at Hankins and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places are the Hankins District No. One Schoolhouse, Hankins StoneArch Bridge, and Anthony Manny House.

Lakewood – A hamlet in the northeast part of the town.

Long Eddy – A hamlet in the extreme western part of the townby the Delaware River. The Riverside Cemetery was listed on the NationalRegister of Historic Places in 1993.

Mileses – A hamlet in the western part of the town, west ofFremont Center.

Obernburg – A hamlet in the northeast part of the town alongRoute 95. Home of St. Mary's Church, the oldest church in the county. Also,named after Obernburg, Germany.

Pleasant Valley – A hamlet in the south part of the town.

Tennanah Lake (formerly Long Pond) – A hamlet in thenortheast part of the town by a lake called "Tennanah Lake."

Town of Cochecton, NY

Town of Cochecton, NY

Cochecton is a town located in west-central Sullivan County. Thepopulation was 1,372 at the 2010 census. The name is an aboriginal word for"low land."

The Town of Cochecton (its official name) is situated on the DelawareRiver, directly across from Damascus, Pennsylvania, to which a bridge over theriver provides access. The village of Cochecton has a ZIP code of 12726; theZIP codes for two other communities located within the town's boundaries —Cochecton Center and Lake Huntington — are 12727 and 12752 respectively.

History

In the original charter of 1664, Cochecton marked theborder between New York and New Jersey. Along the Delaware River, a spot wasmarked named "station rock." This point formed the meeting point ofthe borders between New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. After a long dispute- the New York-New Jersey Line War - the final border was set further south,near Port Jervis.

The town was formed from the Town of Bethel in 1828, andreduced by the creation of the Town of Delaware in 1869.

The town once had a station on the Binghamton branch ofthe Erie-Lackawanna Railway, but passenger service on this branch ceased in1971. The branch has since been taken over by Conrail, and subsequently by CSX.The Cochecton train station is the oldest surviving station in New York State.Moved from its original site in the early 1990s, a local group of people bandedtogether to save the station from destruction. A local business CochectonMills, owned by the Nearing family, gave the group, called the "CochectonPreservation Society", one year to dismantle the ancient building and getit off their property. In that time the station was carefully and successfullymoved roughly one mile upstream to a spot on state Route 97, still restingalong the Erie tracks. More recently, various proposals were made to restoreservice on the line, but none have yet been adopted.

The correct pronunciation of the town's name is"cuh-SHEK-ton," leading many to mistakenly believe the name is ofFrench origin; the name is, however, more likely derived from the Lenni Lenapeword ksch-itchuan, meaning "foaming water." A conflicting, andprobably outdated, interpretation appears in the writings of James Burbank, alocal historian who wrote in the 1950s that the word "Cushektunk"meant "low land" and "land of red rock" indicating theabundance of red mudstone throughout the area.

The Drake-Curtis House, Ellery Calkins House, CochectonPresbyterian Church, Cochecton Railroad Station, Reilly's Store, Parsonage RoadHistoric District, Page House, Old Cochecton Cemetery, and Valleau Tavern arelisted on the National Register of Historic Places.[2]

Cochecton is said to be the home of Tammany, a NativeAmerican sage of the Lenape who became an American symbol and a fixture inpopular culture during and after the Revolutionary War.

Geography

The west town line is theborder of Pennsylvania, in the middle of the Delaware River. It is connected toDamascus Township in that state's Wayne County by the Cochecton–DamascusBridge.

According to the United StatesCensus Bureau, the town has a total area of 37.4 square miles, of which, 36.7square miles is land and 0.7 square miles is water surface.

 

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, therewere 1,328 people, 555 households, and 376 families residing in the town. Thepopulation density was 36.2 people per square mile. There were 955 housingunits at an average density of 26.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of thetown was 96.54% White, 0.90% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.60%Asian, 0.98% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic orLatino of any race were 1.66% of the population.

There were 555 households outof which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% weremarried couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husbandpresent, and 32.1% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up ofindividuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age orolder. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was2.89.

The population includes 22.5%under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years.For every 100 females there were 101.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 andover, there were 99.0 males.

The median income for ahousehold in the town was $41,250, and the median income for a family was$46,875. Males had a median income of $34,583 versus $24,844 for females. Theper capita income for the town was $19,841. About 5.0% of families and 7.2% ofthe population were below the poverty line, including 10.5% of those under age18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over. The peak population, reached during the19th century, was about 3,000.

Communities and locations in Cochecton

Cochecton (formerly Cushetunk)– The hamlet of Cochecton is on state Route 97 by the Delaware River.

Cochecton Center (formerlyStephensburgh) – A hamlet south of Lake Huntingdon on Route 52. The formerCochecton Center Methodist Episcopal Church was listed on the National Registerof Historic Places in 2000.

East Cochecton – A hamletbetween Cochecton and Fosterdale.

Fosterdale – A hamlet in theeastern part of the town at routes 17B and 52.

Lake Huntington – A hamletsouth of Fosterdale on state Route 52. The Jewish Center of Lake Huntington waslisted on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Nobody Station – A location inthe southwest part of the town.

Skinners Falls – A location bythe Delaware River, south of Cochecton village.

Tylertown – A location in thesoutheast part of the town.

Pike County, PA

Pike County, PA

Pike County is a county located on the northeastern tip of Pennsylvania and borders both New York and New Jersey. As of the 2010 census, the population was 57,369. Its county seat is Milford. In 2006, Pike County was the fastest-growing county in Pennsylvania.

Pike County is statistically included in the New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA Metropolitan Area.

History

Pike County was named for General Zebulon Pike. It was created on March 26, 1814 as subdivision of westerly Wayne County. Some English settlement in the area had started during the colonial period.

The longtime original inhabitants were the Lenape Native Americans, known by the English colonists as the Delaware Indians because their territory was along the Delaware River (as named by the colonists), as well as the coastal mid-Atlantic area. In 1696, Governor Benjamin Fletcher of the colony of New York authorized purchases of Indian land near the New York border by a number of citizens of Ulster County; their descendants became the first European settlers of what became Pike County.

Nicholas Depui was the first to settle in the area, in 1725. Thomas Quick moved to the area that would become Milford in 1733. Andrew Dingman settled on the Delaware River at the future site of Dingmans Ferry in 1735. The early settlers got along well with the Lenape and traded with them. As settlement increased and their land practices encroached on Lenape uses, land disputes arose. The colonists' infamous Walking Purchase of 1737 swindled the Indians out of more than half of present-day Pike County. As they realized what had happened, violent conflicts arose between the Lenape and the colonists.

 Early in the nineteenth century, coal was discovered nearby in the area that would become Carbondale. To get the coal to New York, developers proposed a gravity railroad from Carbondale to Honesdale, along with a canal from Honesdale to the Hudson River at Kingston.

The state of New York approved the canal proposal in 1823. Work on the 108-mile Delaware and Hudson Canal began in 1825 and was completed in 1828. The canal system which terminated at the Hudson River near present-day Kingston, proved profitable. But, the barges had to cross the Delaware via a rope ferry across a "slackwater dam," which created bottlenecks in the canal traffic and added greatly to the cost of transportation.

John Roebling proposed continuing the canal over the river as part of an aqueduct. Built in 1848, his innovative cable suspension design required only three piers, where five would ordinarily have been required; this allowed ice floes and timber rafts to pass under with less damage to the bridge. Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct is still standing, recognized as the oldest suspension bridge in the world. Restored by the National Park Service, it is a National Historic Landmark. The New York and Erie Railroad supplanted the canal and in 1898 the water route was abandoned.

His estate, Grey Towers in Milford was the home of future PA Governor Gifford Pinchot. A close friend of President Theodore Roosevelt, Pinchot would become the first director of US Forest Service. From 1904 to 1926, Grey Towers was the site of summer field study sessions for the Master's program of the Yale School of Forestry together with the Foresters Hall, a commercial building that was adapted and expanded for this purpose. Roosevelt visited at Grey Towers as did President John F. Kennedy in 1961

In 1926, the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company built a hydroelectric plant on Wallenpaupack creek at the former village of Wilsonville. The town was evacuated and now lies under Lake Wallenpaupack, created by the resulting dam. A crew of 2,700 men worked for two years to complete the dam for the project at a cost of $1,026,000. This required the acquisition of nearly a hundred properties, and a number of farms, barns, and homes were razed or moved. In addition, 17 miles (27 km) of roads and telephone lines were relocated, and a cemetery was moved to make way for the project.

Since the late 20th century, Pike County has been the fastest-growing county in Pennsylvania; between 1990 and 2000, its population increased by 65.2%, and it grew an additional 16.9% between 2000 and 2004. The area has relatively low state and county taxes, affordable housing, and Interstate 80 and Interstate 84 provide rapid commutes to New York City's northern suburbs.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 567 square miles, of which 545 square miles is land and 22 square miles (3.9%) is water surface.

The terrain rises rapidly from the river valley in the east to the rolling foothills of the Poconos in the west. The highest point is one of two unnamed hills in Greene Township that top out at approximately 2,110 feet (643 m) above sea level.[6] The lowest elevation is approximately 340 feet (103.6 m), at the confluence of the Bushkill and the Delaware rivers.

Population

As of the 2010 census, there were 57,369 people residing in the county. The county was 88.6% Non-Hispanic White, 6.3% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 1.2% Asian, and 1.7% were two or more races. 10.2% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.

As of the census of 2000, there were 46,302 people, 17,433 households, and 13,022 families residing in the county. The population density was 85 people per square mile. There were 34,681 housing units at an average density of 63 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 93.10% White, 3.27% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.30% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. 5.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.9% were of German, 18.6% Irish, 18.5% Italian, 6.2% English and 5.3% Polish ancestry.

There were 17,433 households out of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.50% were married couples living together, 7.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.30% were non-families. 20.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.06.

The population includes 26.70% under the age of 18, 5.30% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 25.10% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 99.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.30 males.

Pike County has the largest percentage of same-sex couples in Pennsylvania.

Schools

Delaware Valley School District

East Stroudsburg Area School District (also in Monroe County)

Wallenpaupack Area School District (also Wayne County)

Communities

Boroughs

Matamoras, Milford (county seat)

Townships

Blooming Grove, Delaware, Dingman, Greene, Lackawaxen, Lehman, Milford, Palmyra, Porter, Shohola and Westfall

Census-designated places

Birchwood Lakes, Conashaugh Lakes, Fawn Lake Forest, Gold Key Lake, Hemlock Farms, Masthope, Pine Ridge, Pocono Mountain Lake Estates, Pocono Ranch Lands, Pocono Woodland Lakes, Saw Creek, and Sunrise Lake

Other notables associated with Pike County

Vanessa Carlton - (born 1980) singer/songwriter

Zane Grey - (1872-1939) author of western stories and novels including Riders of the Purple Sage

Louis Allen, a New York Army National Guard officer killed in a fragging incident in 2005 during the Iraq War.

Science fiction writers: James Blish, Damon Knight, Judith Merril and Kate Wilhelm (Mrs. Knight)  

Allyn Joslyn, stage and screen actor

Frank McCourt, author

Charles Sanders Peirce, a philosopher and polymath, lived on a farm near Milford, from 1887 until his 1914 death.

Mary Pickford, silent film actress

Al Pitrelli, guitarist

Tom Quick, notorious early settler

Marie Zimmermann designer and maker of jewelry and metalwork

Smoky Joe Wood, Pike native and baseball pitcher.

Robert Litzenberger, professor emeritus at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Lackawaxen Township, PA

Lackawaxen Township, PA

Lackawaxen Townshipis the largest and northernmost township in Pike County, Pennsylvania. Thepopulation was 4,994 at the 2010 census. The Delaware River, which marks theeastern boundary of the township, joins the Lackawaxen River at historicLackawaxen Village. The planned communities of Fawn Lake Forest, Tink-Wig Lakeand Masthope Mountain are in the township.

History

European-American settlers in 1798 adopted the Lenape nameLackawaxen, meaning "swift waters," after the river that flows twelvemiles through the township.

Bands of both Algonquian-speaking Lenape andIroquoian-speaking Seneca lived in the area through the early 19th century.Neither tribe had any substantial villages in the area, and they used the landas hunting grounds. Their tools, pot shards and bone fragments have been foundat Native American rock shelters and camp sites.

In 1770, Jonathan Conkling and John Barnes became the firstpermanent European settlers to build in the area.

 At the 1779 Battle ofMinisink at nearby Minisink Ford, NY, 48 European colonial militia were killedin an engagement with a band of Mohawks and tory loyalists led by Joseph Brant,a Mohawk who commanded forces for the British. A county park today marks thebattle site.

During the early part of the 19th century, logging was theprincipal commercial activity in the area. It produced as much as 50 millionboard feet (120,000 m³) of lumber annually. Workers floated logs downriver onthe Delaware to markets in Easton or Trenton.

In 1829, the Delaware and Hudson Canal began operatingbetween Honesdale, Pennsylvania and Kingston, New York. In its time, the canalcompany was the largest private commercial enterprise in the nation. It built28 locks in Lackawaxen Township alone, raising the elevation of the canal 278feet

John A. Roebling, famed engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge, builtthe Delaware Aqueduct, as part of the canal in 1848. It is the world’s oldestsurviving wire-cable suspension bridge and is now preserved by the NationalPark Service (NPS) as a National Civil Engineering Landmark and NationalHistoric Landmark.

Later in 19th Century, the Erie Railroad broughttourism to the area and new sources of revenue; the rugged countryside of theupper Delaware Valley became a popular destination for urban tourists.

Bluestone quarrying became a major enterprise in themid-19th century. The distinctive shale was used extensively in theconstruction of the region's buildings and still remains in many sidewalks.

From 1905 to 1918, famed western author Zane Grey lived inLackawaxen with his wife and growing family. His early stories related hisexperiences of fishing along the upper Delaware. Listed on the NationalRegister of Historic Places, the Greys' home from 1914 to 1918 is preserved bythe NPS. Grey is buried in nearby Union Cemetery.

Geography

According to the US Census, the township has a total area of81.2 square miles of which, 78.4 square miles of it is land and 2.8 squaremiles are water surface. A scenic area within the Upper Delaware River NationalPark, Lackawaxen is located about a two-hour drive from New York City. It isalso located about twenty-two miles north-west of Milford, the county seat ofPike County.

Population

In 2010, the Census reported 2,099 households, and 1,453families residing in the township. The population density was 63.7 people persquare mile. There were 4,580 housing units at an average density of 58.4 persq mi. The racial makeup of the township was 94.2% White, 2.7% AfricanAmerican, 0.2% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.7% fromother races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any racewere 4.2% of the population.

There were 2,099 households out of which 22.1% had childrenunder the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples livingtogether, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.8% werenon-families. 26% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% hadsomeone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average householdsize was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.85.

The population included 19.1% under the age of 18, 58.5%from 18 to 64, and 22.4% who were 65 years of age or older; and the median agewas 48.8 years.

The median income for a household in the township was$38,090, and the median income for a family was $46,856. Males had a medianincome of $35,758 versus $20,268 for females. The per capita income for thetownship was $19,119. About 7.4% of families and 9.7% of the population werebelow the poverty line, including 14.5% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of thoseage 65 or over.

Wayne County, PA

Wayne County, PA

Wayne County is a sixth-class county in Pennsylvania. The county's population was 52,822 at the time of the 2010 United States Census. The county seat is the Borough of Honesdale. The county was formed from part of Northampton County on March 21, 1798, and was named for the Revolutionary War General Anthony Wayne.

line-height:normal'>The courts for the new county were temporarily established in Milford. In 1799 they were moved to Wilsonville (Lake Wallenpaupack area).  In 1802 the courts moved back to Milford.  Bethany became and remained the county seat from 1814-1841. The opening of the Delaware & Hudson Canal in 1829 and pressure from the lower end of the County finally in 1814 caused the Legislature to set off the section as a new County to be called Pike, with the seat of Justice at Milford.  In May 1841, the County Commissioners fixed Honesdale as the new county seat and Bethany lost that distinction.

The discovery of anthracite coal in northeastern Pennsylvania, in the early 1800’s, and the need to transport this fuel to New York City gave birth to: the Delaware and Hudson Canal, the American Railroad and the Borough of Honesdale.

 Farming, ice harvesting, lumbering, tanneries, children’s summer camps and boarding homes all contributed to the early Wayne County economy. Today, tourism, and farming and the second home industry and the related commercial enterprises continue to play an important part in employing the citizens of Wayne County.

Wayne County is made up of 28 local municipalities, 22 townships of the second class and 6 Boroughs. The County consists of 763 square miles or 488,265 acres of land. Between 1991 and 2000 residential land use has increased from 226,995 acres to 240,390 acres and agricultural land use has decreased from 161,037 acres to 149,552 acres. The industrial acreage of Wayne County increased from 528 acres to 978 while the commercial acreage increased from 9,762 to 14,254 acres.

Major highways in Wayne County are Interstate 380 & 84, U.S. Route 6 and Pennsylvania Route 191. Interstate 81 and New York Route 17 are located near Wayne County and also play an important role in the overall transportation framework of the County. All airports in Wayne County are privately owned. The largest of these airports being the Cherry Ridge Airport in Cherry Ridge Township and Spring Hill Airpark in Sterling Township.

The terrain of the county is varied. In the wider northern half, the land is rugged along its border with New York State, while the southern portion tends to be swampier. Higher hills and mountains are predominantly found along the county's western edge, while lower ones are more common in the east, near the Delaware River. The middle section of Wayne County is a wide plain.

The highest elevation in the county, 2,659 ft., is the summit of Mount Ararat in Orson. Two other summits at the north end of the same ridge also exceed 2,640 ft. in elevation. The county's lowest point, at approximately 680 ft. above sea level, is along the Delaware, near Wayne County's border with Pike County, Pennsylvania.

Most of Wayne County is drained by the Delaware (which separates Pennsylvania from New York), with the exception of a few small areas in the western part of the county, which are drained by either the Starrucca Creek or the Lackawanna River (which both eventually flow into the Susquehanna River).

Honesdale Borough PA

Honesdale Borough PA
Honesdale is aborough in and the county seat of Wayne County.

The borough's population was 4,480 at the time of the 2010United States Census.

Honesdale is located 32 miles northeast of Scranton in arural and farming area that provides many recreational opportunities, such asboating, fishing, hiking, hunting, skiing, biking, skateboarding, and rafting. Itowes its name to former New York City Mayor Phillip Hone, who was influential inthe creation of the Delaware and Hudson (D&H) Canal. In 1829 it became the westerlystarting point of the 108-mile-long canal, which provided water transport forcoal shipped to Honesdale on a gravity railroad from southerly LackawannaCounty’s mountains. The canal ran to Kingston, New York, where it was trans-shippedand sent down the Hudson River to New York City. In the mid-19th century theexpansion of railroads reduced the canal’s use and led to its abandonment in1898.

Honesdale was originally called Dyberry Forks and was laidout as a village in 1826 when the D & H Canal was under construction. Itwas incorporated as a borough on January 28, 1831.

The Honesdale’s Residential Historic District and the D& H Canal are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Honesdale is the location where the first commercial steamlocomotive ran on rails in the United States. Imported by the D&H Company fromEngland, the “Stourbridge Lion” on August 8, 1829, ran three miles on a hastilyconstructed rail bed to Seelyville, and returned. Considered impractical forhauling coal from the mines, the Stourbridge Lion never ran again. Acombination of stationary steam engines and gravity powered the movement ofcoal to Honesdale from Carbondale’s mines.

The Wayne County Historical Society Museum, located in the formerD&H Canal Co. office Honesdale exhibits a full-scale replica of theStourbridge Lion. A majority of the canal route was incorporated into thesubsequent highway system, but many portions in both NY and PA survive forvisitors to see.

The Stourbridge Lion was sold for scrap, but some of itsparts are on display at the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum in Baltimore,Maryland.

Honesdale is located at Global coordinates: 41°34′27″N75°15′21″W. The borough has a total area of 4.0 square miles which, is dividedby the Lackawaxen River and Dyberry Creek.  The waters contain fish and other aquatic lifeand attract hundreds of ducks, as well as eagles and other raptors.

The 2010 Census lists 2,086 households, and 1,147 familiesresiding in the borough. The population density was 1,148.7 people per squaremile. There were 2,357 housing units at an average density of 604.4 per squaremile. The racial makeup of the borough was 96.8% White, 0.9% African American,0.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.2% from two ormore races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.8% of the population. Themedian income for a household in the borough was $32,644, and the median incomefor a family was $42,088.

The hospital serving Honesdale and the surroundingcommunities is Wayne Memorial Hospital. It is a successful and progressivenonprofit community hospital of 112 beds and does approximately 75 milliondollars of net revenue of business annually. The Hospital offers a wide arrayof advanced health services and is clinically affiliated with the WayneMemorial Community Health Centers and The Commonwealth Medical College.

Honesdale High School is part of the Wayne Highlands SchoolDistrict. The school's sports teams are called the Hornets. The high school is locatedon the top of Terrace Street and overlooks the town. The district has anenrollment of 2,756. Wayne Highlands schools in Honesdale also include the StourbridgePrimary School, Lakeside Elementary and Wayne Highlands Middle School. The websitek12.niche.com ranked Wayne Highlands as the 105th best of 497 PA districtssurveyed in 2017.

Town of Delaware, NY

Coming soon!

Town of Forestburgh, NY

Coming soon!

Sullivan County, NY Area Map